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Washington State University Institute for Shock Physics

Tenure-Track Faculty Positions

Washington State University (WSU) is committed to significant advances in research, innovation, and scholarship through strategic investments in faculty, research infrastructure, and by building on WSU’s research strengths.  The Shock Physics effort at WSU has a long and distinguished record — spanning 55 plus years — of research excellence and rigorous education.  The Institute for Shock Physics (ISP), a highly successful multidisciplinary research organization within the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS), is nationally/internationally recognized for its scientific achievements and leadership in dynamic compression science.

Tenure-Track Faculty Positions

Institute for Shock Physics, Pullman, WA

Assistant/Associate Professor (Tenure Track)
Experimentalist 

The Institute for Shock Physics (ISP) is a multidisciplinary research organization, within the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) at Washington State University (WSU), with an emphasis on understanding condensed matter response at extreme conditions. The WSU shock physics effort, widely recognized as the academic leader in the field, has a long and distinguished history of research innovations and excellence, and rigorous hands-on training in studying material response under extreme dynamic compression. Spanning more than 60 years, many pioneering developments in shock wave experiments and theory have been carried out at WSU. One of WSU’s most notable achievements in this field has been the outstanding group of scientists who have been educated and trained as graduate students and postdoctoral research associates. These individuals have gone on to become leaders in this field. Academic partners in the Institute’s dynamic compression activities include Princeton University, California Institute of Technology, and Stanford University.

WSU is making investments to broaden and enhance the Institute’s unique and eminent national role well into the future and has established a tenure-track faculty position in the Institute for Shock Physics (ISP). We are seeking to hire an outstanding experimentalist in the area of Dynamic Compression Science with a background in the Physical Sciences. For applicants at the Assistant Professor level, a strong track record of research publications and potential for obtaining external funding is required. Exceptionally strong applicants will be considered for a position at the Associate Professor rank.

Professor (Tenure Track) and Associate Director

The Institute for Shock Physics (ISP) is a multidisciplinary research organization, within the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) at Washington State University (WSU), with an emphasis on understanding condensed matter response at extreme conditions. The WSU shock physics effort, widely recognized as the academic leader in the field, has a long and distinguished history of research innovations and excellence, and rigorous hands-on training in studying material response under extreme dynamic compression. Spanning more than 60 years, many pioneering developments in shock wave experiments and theory have been carried out at WSU.  One of WSU’s most notable achievements in this field has been the outstanding group of scientists who have been educated and trained as graduate students and postdoctoral research associates.  These individuals have gone on to become leaders in this field.[1]  Academic partners in the Institute’s dynamic compression activities include Princeton University, California Institute of Technology, and Stanford University.

This is a permanent, full-time, academic year (9 month), tenure-track position in the Institute for Shock Physics, located on the WSU Pullman campus, with the possibility of a joint appointment and tenure in the relevant academic department at WSU. Additionally, there exist excellent opportunities for collaborations with faculty at partner universities (Princeton, Caltech, and Stanford), and scientists at the DOE/NNSA and DoD Laboratories.

 

Washington State University